Tuesday, May 08, 2007

Construction Sites

Sometime in April, a freaky wind smashed the top of the trellis. Its bones were left hanging precariously in the almost bare vines of the Lady Banksia rose. I had built it some years ago with the boards from a temporary wheel chair ramp which my neighbors had constructed for my husband to use for a few weeks before he died. I probably didn't do a very good job, but it worked. I dreaded the chore of repairing it; I had repaired it once before when a car ran into it.

I did what I usually do it situations like this. I procrastinated. After all, it would soon be time for the rose to bloom and then it would need to be pruned and . . . .

So, now it has bloomed.
It was spectacular.

I have cut away much of the dead growth and have begun to trim as little as possible to keep from totally destroying the main growth, but enough to reconstruct the supports from beneath. It will not be easy, but this time I will have the help of two daughters and Lucy.

I will use Patrick Dougherty's sculpture as inspiration.




It promises to be spectacular again next spring,






Dome of Sculpture at Bluffton, SC. More about Daugherty's sculpture at The Stolen Day-- Part II -- April 2007 archive

2 comments:

KJ said...

Trying like crazy to remember where I saw Daugherty's stick sculpture years ago. A marvel, it was... thanks for the reminder. You were right that the nameless vine around the lake house mailbox is a Lady Banks Rose... it bloomed beautifully, flowers lasted at least ten days in a vase, amazing! But mine can't get as big as yours... not where it's located. Can only hope for creative pruning. KJ

Annette said...

Karen
Hope you were able to follow the link to my previous blog entry on Pat Daugherty. Somehow I mixed up my permanent link links! I had a 15-20 minute conversation with him a couple of years ago. Unbelievably nice.

Best time to prune the lady is now and again in mid-summer. She will handle fairly severe pruning. Just don't wait too late since the blooms are on the before winter growth.
AAB